A northbound Rock Island train was derailed from this trestle on August 9, 1894, resulting in a crash, massive fire, and the deaths of eleven passengers and crew, despite the heroic action of Harry Foote, brakeman, who rescued many. G. W. Davis,…

Thousands of oxen-drawn wagons passed here from 1860 to 1867, before completion of the Union Pacific Railroad across Nebraska. Carrying military and mining supplies, and emigrants moving west, they cut deep ruts across the tallgrass prairie and at…

In 1874 construction began on Lincoln's first U.S. Post Office and Courthouse on a block originally intended as a market square. The building was completed by 1879 at a cost of about. $200,000. Alfred B. Mullet, supervising architect of the U.S.…

In 1878 public-spirited citizens, led by former governor Robert W. Furnas, organized the Nebraska State Historical Society. The legislature designated the Society a state institution in 1883 and began providing financial support.

Crounse was once a small village named for Lorenzo Crounse, Nebraska Supreme Court justice (1867-73). congressman (1873-77), and governor (1893-95). The village had a school (1870-1962), post office (1873-1901), church, general store, and creamery.…

The North Bottoms neighborhood was settled by Germans from Russia beginning in the 1870s. During the preceding century they had colonized in Russia, attracted by offers of free land, military exemption, and political autonomy. In 1871, when the Czar…

The Civilian Conservation Corps was authorized by Congress in 1933 to provide jobs and vocational training for young men during the Depression. Company 2738 with 216 men was organized at Nebraska City, then moved to a campsite on the Gilbert farm…

Lincoln Army Air field was constructed in 1942 on the former Lincoln Municipal Airport. The 2,750-acre property was leased to the army by the City of Lincoln. The base provided technical training for aircraft mechanics, basic training for army…

In 1869 the Nebraska legislature authorized the construction of a facility to care for mentally ill persons. The 160-acre site was located just north of the village of Yankee Hill, and southwest of Lincoln, the newly established state capital.…

General John J. Pershing, commander of the American Expeditionary Forces to Europe in World War I, was Professor of Military Science at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln between September 1891 and June 1895. Upon his arrival in Lincoln, which was to…

Marguerite Metzger Hall and Neil W. Hall Nine-Mile Prairie Memorial as a living tribute to our Pioneer Forebears and as a legacy for future generations ____________________________ A memorial to the Past, A joy to the…

This boulder is one of the largest "erratics" ever recovered in the Belmont area, and was found in excavations one-quarter mile east of this point. It was carried to this area thousands of years ago by the ice of a continental glacier and then…

The Territorial Legislature at Omaha drew the boundaries of Lancaster County in 1855. Settlers first arrived in 1856 and a county government was established "on paper" in 1859. Methodist Elder John M. Young arrived at the head of a colony in 1863,…

William Henry Ferguson, Lincoln businessman and investor, built this house in 1909-11. It is one of the best examples of the Second Renaissance Revival style in Lincoln and perhaps in Nebraska. Architects were Searles, Hirsh and Gavin of Cleveland,…

Elisha M. Lewis, early Nebraska pastor and missionary, built this French Second Empire style house in about 1878. The Syford family owned the property from 1904 until the daughter, Constance willed the house in 1965 to the Nebraska State Historical…

From the heroics of stunt fliers at pre-World War I state fairs through the experimentation of the 1920s, Lincoln held a unique position in aviation manufacturing and pilot training. After WWI, Ray Page and his wife Ethel purchased surplus Army…

Lincoln can boast of a colorful parade of fliers in aviation's formative decades: Joe and Bob Westover were mechanics for Ruth Law, pre-World War I aviatrix. The Nebraska National Guard produced Capt. Ralph McMillen, killed at a Kansas air show in…

You are overlooking original prairie never broken by a plow. Nebraska looked much like this 200 years ago before the white men came: Grasses on which buffalo, elk, deer and antelope fed; ground cover for homes for quail, grouse, and prairie chickens;…

On March 6, 1855, Lancaster County was created by act of the Territorial Legislature. Many early settlers came for land, while others were attracted by the commercial possibilities of the nearby Salt Basin. In 1859, a site east of the Salt Basin was…

Chartered as a Land-Grant institution by the first regular session of the State Legislature on February 15, 1869, the University opened its doors to 20 collegiate students and 110 preparatory school pupils on September 7, 1871. Lincoln was then a raw…

William Jennings Bryan was born in Salem, Illinois in 1860. He moved to Lincoln in 1887, entered into law practice and was elected to Congress in 1890. He won the first of three presidential nominations with his "Cross of Gold" speech at the…

From 1854 to 1867 the seat of territorial and state government was in Omaha. In 1867 the State Legislature appointed a Capital Commission to select a location for the new state capitol. Commission members Governor David Butler, Auditor John Gillespie…