George and Sarah Joslyn Home

The Joslyns purchased the Sutphen farm in 1893 and began landscaping the five-acre site. Omaha architect John McDonald designed the mansion to resemble a Scottish manor. Named Lynhurst and known locally as "Joslyn Castle," the thirty-four-room house…

Captain William Clark and Private Reuben Field

On July 27, 1804, Lewis and Clark's Corps of Discovery left their "White Catfish" camp and proceeded up the Missouri River. After traveling some distance, Clark "took one man R. Field and walked on Shore with a View of Examoning Som mounds" on the…

Chief Standing Bear

The land around the mouth of the Niobrara in northeastern Nebraska is the homeland of the Ponca Tribe. In 1868 the federal government signed the Treaty of Fort Laramie that transferred this land to the Sioux. The Poncas were forcibly removed to…

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

At this site in 1898, Omaha hosted the Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition. Following the model of other "world's fairs," the exposition highlighted the "Progress of the West," drawing over 2.5 million admissions. The exposition grounds…

William Henry Jackson

From 1867 to 1869 the first photography studio of William Henry Jackson, renowned photographer, artist, and explorer of the Old West, stood on the northwest corner of this block. His autobiography, Time Exposure, reports that in 1869 Omaha had the…

Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition

In 1898, following the financial panic of 1893 and the droughts of 1894-95, a world-class exposition was held in Omaha under the guidance of Gurdon W. Wattles and other civic leaders. The Trans-Mississippi and International Exposition emulated…

Lewis and Clark Camp Site: July 27, 1804

At the camp established very near here Captain Clark wrote about the "butifull Breeze from the N W. this evening which would have been verry agreeable, had the Misquiters been tolerably Pacifick, but thy were rageing all night." Clark may have…

Fort Atkinson

A few miles north is Ft. Atkinson (1819-27), the first U.S. military post west of the Missouri River. The fort's location at the "Council Bluff" was recommended by Lewis and Clark in 1804. It was established to assert U.S. influence over the Indian…

Platte River History

Just to the southwest is the Platte River, whose valley was one of the great roadways to the west, used by fur traders, emigrants, military expeditions, gold seekers, and Mormons. Mormon migration to the Salt Lake Valley began at Winter Quarters,…

Shipley Cemetery

The Shipley Cemetery, named for William Shipley, is located one-half mile north of this marker. In 1893 Shipley deeded part of his homestead for public use as a cemetery. The oldest known burial, dated 1861, is Shipley's grandson, James. In addition…

Malcolm X

El-Hajj Malik El-Shabazz was born Malcolm Little at University Hospital in Omaha, Nebraska, May 19, 1925. He was the son of Earl and Louise Little, 3448 Pinkney Street. Reverend Little helped organize the Universal Negro Improvement Association.…

Forest Lawn Memorial Park

Forest Lawn Memorial Park was established May 13, 1885, under the guidance of the Forest Lawn Cemetery Association. Its membership included pioneer Omaha business and professional men. A founding trustee, John H. Brackin, offered the original area of…

Prospect Hill - Omaha's Pioneer Cemetery

Founded in 1858 by Byron Reed, early Omaha real estate developer and financier, Prospect Hill is the final resting place for over 15,000 citizens. While burial permit #1 was issued for Territorial Legislator Alonzo Salisbury on October 4, 1858, many…

Oto Indians

Prehistoric Indians were the earliest inhabitants of this area. By 1760, the Oto and part of the Missouri Tribe occupied an earth lodge village near here on the west bank of the Platte River, a short distance above the mouth of the Elkhorn. Spanish…

Boettger Farm

This 160-acre farm, most of which is now a lake and recreational area, was once home to three generations of Boettgers: William A. and Mina Stuhr Boettger, Otto M. and Irene Grau Boettger, Robert D. and Nadeen Preston Boettger. Homesteaded by Isaac…

Duchesne Academy

In October 1881, Mother Margaret Dunne and three religious of the Sacred Heart opened a boarding school for girls at a temporary location on Ninth and Howard in Omaha. On September 1, 1882, Bishop James O'Connor sold Park Place, a 12-acre site "west…

Central High School

The first session of Omaha High School, now Central High School, was held on November 10, 1859, in Nebraska's territorial capitol on Ninth Street between Douglas and Farnam. Following the removal of the territorial government from Omaha, Nebraska's…

Crook House

On April 27, 1875, General George A. Crook assumed command of the Department of the Platte, which then included Iowa, Nebraska, Wyoming, Utah, and part of Montana and Idaho. When the headquarters was shifted from downtown Omaha to Fort Omaha (Omaha…

Ak-Sar-Ben Field and the U.S. Air Mail

Ak-Sar-Ben Field, whose hangars were located on the southeastern corner of these grounds, was used extensively during the early development of U.S. Postal Air Mail Service. Ray Benedict landed here with the first airmail from Chicago on May 15, 1920…

Omaha

Buried here at Ak-Sar-Ben is Omaha, one of the immortals of the American turf. His sire Gallant Fox was the 1930 winner of the Triple Crown, and Omaha succeeded him to this title in 1935. To win the Triple Crown a three-year-old must win the Kentucky…

The Florence Mill

The Florence Mill, one of the earliest in Nebraska, was constructed by the Mormons at Winter Quarters during the winter of 1846-1847. Supplying both flour and lumber, the water-powered mill enabled the Mormons to cope more readily with the adverse…

Fort Omaha

A military post was first established here in 1868 and named Sherman Barracks after the famous Civil War general, William Tecumseh Sherman. The post's name was soon changed to Omaha Barracks and, in 1878, to Fort Omaha. In 1879, General George Crook,…

The Bank of Florence

The Bank of Florence was chartered by the Nebraska Territorial legislature on January 18, 1856. It was located in this substantial building, constructed during the same year. Sheet steel one quarter inch thick, shipped by river steamboat from…

Capitol Hill

This site on Capitol Hill was for a decade the location of Nebraska's second territorial capitol. The building was erected here in 1857 and 1858 and served until the seat of government was removed to Lincoln in 1868. Acting-Governor Cuming designated…

Winter Quarters

Here in 1846 an oppressed people fleeing from a vengeful mob found a haven in the wilderness. Winter Quarters, established under the direction of the Mormon leader Brigham Young, sheltered more than 3,000 people during the winter of 1846-1847. Housed…

Creighton University

This University is named for Edward and John A. Creighton -- Ohio farm boys who gained immortality in the West. They helped to link our coasts by telegraph during the Civil War. They pioneered as cattlemen on the Laramie Plains, as merchants in the…

Kobs Pioneer Cemetery

Albert Kobs (1845-91) emigrated from Germany in 1867. His wife, Henrietta C. (Labs) Kobs (1848-82) emigrated from the same area in 1870 and the couple soon married. They purchased a farm in 1874, on which five of their eight children were born.…

Poynter Hall

In 1902 the Omaha Medical College, a private medical school, affiliated with the University of Nebraska to form the University of Nebraska College of Medicine. At first, classes were split between Lincoln and Omaha. After much debate, in 1909 the…

Before Creighton

Archaeological evidence shows periodic Native American residence in this general area for some 12,000 years. From the mid-1600s to the early 1700s the Omaha, Ponca, Oto, and Ioway migrated from the Upper Midwest and Great Lakes to today's western…